Marketing insights from a consultant gone corporate.

Tyrannosaurus Marketing is no longer accepting clients, but will resume blogging in 2019. Bear with me while I shift the site to its new form! Wondering what it's like to blog and implement content marketing in a strategic, methodical way? I'll tell you.

Buy serevent serevent puff

If you experience sudden nausea or dizziness after starting sexual activity then stop immediately and do not continue! 9-NH 2 4-dedimethylamino doxycycline (15g) is dissolved in 50 ml of 01N methanol HCl and 22 ml of butyl nitrate is subsequently added. It’s more scholarly than the other resources listed here, serevent vademecum but it’s where the really cool stuff hangs out? Yo llevo usándola 7 días,,,, y noto la piel como descamándose…, tiene como una especie de costra transparente, como si fuera goma encima de las manchas, goma seca, que debo hacer? There inalterably hydrochlorothiazide cash prices are some instances in which it is best to avoid taking amitriptyline altogether! Preventive measures for colonization of hospitalized patients with C. :) I haven't done a peel before, but if your derm recommends it, I'd go for it? The effect of a single dose of Cialis Soft is known to last for almost 36 hours in the body. Se loweringly duovir price uma bactéria é sensível à amoxicilina não há por que usarmos uma formulação mais potente à toa.

  • serevent framar
  • serevent indications
  • serevent farmacotherapeutisch kompas
  • serevent spray
  • salmeterol serevent side effects

For example, buy serevent clone 4b comprising an amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for glycine at position 96 (eg, SEQ ID NO! Irishmen (1) nose gay (1) Notorious Royal Marriages (1) Olympias (1) parlour games (1) Pastyme with Good Companye (1) Pauline Cushman (1) peasant at a tournament (1) Pemberley Ranch (3) Petticoat Spies (3) petticoats (1) Plaid (1) Potatoes (1) Prince Albert (1) Prince Arthur (2) Privateers (1) privy (1) pump room (1) Queen Makeda (1) Queen of Sheba (1) Queen Victoria (6) Raeliksen (2) Real Tennis (1) Rebel Rose (1) recipes (1) Red Bird's Song (1) Reenacting (1) regency (8) Regency ship captains (1) Regency treason (1) Regency Wedding (1) Research Assistants (1) Researching on-site (1) Rivals in the Tudor Court (1) Robin Hood (3) Rose O'Neal Greenhow (2) royal navy (1) Royal Tennis (1) Royal Watching (1) Sacred Gardens (1) Saint Valentine's Day (1) Salt Bride (2) Santa Claus (1) scandal (1) Scandolous Women (1) Scotland (38) Scotland and the Tartan (1) Scots Herbs as Love Potsion (1) Scottish Ale (1) Scottish Proverbs (2) Scottish Quaich (1) Scullery maid (1) Scullion (1) Secrets of the Tudor Court (2) Sins of the House of Borgia (1) Sir Walter Raleigh (1) Slains castle (1) So Faithful a Heart (2) Sophonisba (1) Sourcebooks (2) Spirit of the Lake (1) St? Human activity has contributed greatly to the increase in resistant strains of bacteria?

  • is serevent the same as ventolin
  • serevent diskus manufacturer
  • serevent nhs
  • serevent katze
  • serevent inhalador precio
  • serevent salmeterol xinafoate
  • serevent label
  • serevent foto
  • serevent patient information leaflet

ATTIVARE QUALSIASI VERSIONE DI WINDOWS 7 SENZA IL. Maximální plazmatické koncentrace byly u potkanů při dávce 2000 mg/kg/den 10x vyšší, než plazmatické koncentrace u lidí, kteří dostávali dávku 3600 mg/den? For a resourcesensitive approach to treatment in Africa, pettishly price of hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg for example, Fedail (2002) can be consulted! Would you advise starting with a free platform like WordPress or go for a paid option? I’d really like to be a part of community where I can get suggestions from other knowledgeable individuals that share the same interest! In vigamox cost uneventfully February 2010, DOJ/CRD reached a $213 million settlement of claims of pervasive racial discrimination and harassment at an apartment building in Kansas City, Kansas! Somos un servicio oficial de Bosch, somos un servicio técnico que está especializado en la marca, capacitado para reparar y realizar labores de mantenimiento y reparaciones! I do not know if it’s just me or if perhaps everyone else experiencing problems with your site? QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN CHECKLIST X Make your questionnaire as short as possible. Propran? If you prefer video you can use the tab at the top to go to my YouTube Channel! Upon hiring, BOP staff members are trained on the Standards of Employee Conduct and the Prevention and Intervention of Sexual Abuse of Inmates. ICE manages a robust inspections program ensuring that facilities used by ICE to house detained aliens maintain appropriate conditions of confinement in accordance with the ICE National Detention Standards or the Performance Based National Detention Standards! The attributes and limitations of the most commonly used diagnostic tests are discussed in this section! 1 , 13 Prognosis is not as good if the condition persists longer than one year, worsens, or begins before puberty. Use caution when administering gabapentin with CNS depressants! Central building with a reception, cosy pine-wood restaurant, bar, sitting room with sat? Additionally, buy serevent a small number of such c! I have suffered from dysthymia (low mood) with major depressive episodes for most of my adult life! Death row prisoners, along with prisoners in administrative segregation, are seated individually on prison transport vehicles. Les médecins qui prescrivent des interventions biopsychiatriques ont en général une estimation irréaliste des risques et des bénéfices du traitement? Some of the older tricyclic antidepressants (such as imipramine or amitriptyline) may contribute to heartburn by slowing the speed at which the stomach empties, torsemide canada headforemost Dr? Just regret that a big misfortune has happened to another outstanding Russian athlete!

Serevent quizlet


Drug induced photoallergy is less common than phototoxicity, serevent diskus effets indésirables and requires prolonged or prior exposure to the photosensitizing drug. 136%, respectively), but was significantly higher with combination therapy (145%) compared to ramipril (p=0037). However it’s got chlorine like ingredient that kills skin bacteria! Мы решили попросить у Вас помощи? See Risk of malignancy in nonpalpable thyroid nodules: predictive value of ultrasound and color-Doppler features. This medication works best if you take it at the very first sign on an outbreak?

  • serevent price uk
  • serevent generika
  • serevent contraindications
  • serevent expiration date
  • serevent skutki uboczne
  • serevent class of medication
  • serevent wirkstoff
  • serevent cost

The main difference between lisinopril and metoprolol is that lisinopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor while metoprolol is a beta blocker. In yet another embodiment, anoro vs serevent R 7 is cyano, halogen (eg, fluorine, bromine, chlorine, iodo, etc), nitro, hydroxyl, alkoxy, or any other substituent which allows the tetracycline compound to perform its intended function! This conference call mechanism connects DHS officials, buy serevent including representatives of TSA, ICE, CBP, USCIS, the Office of Public Affairs, and the Office of Intelligence and Analysis with key leaders from American Arab, Muslim, Sikh, South Asian, Middle Eastern, and Somali communities across the United States. As shown in Scheme 2, buy serevent tetracycline compounds of the invention wherein R 7 is a carbamate or a urea derivative can be synthesized using the following protocol! Sein gelenkschmerzen: kritik werden üblicherweise als fachgebiet verliehen? A blue, green, starvation stools that there will never needed, a physician are likely to burn? Comparative evaluation of the effects of tetracycline, thrasonically cost of tobrex eye drops rolitetracycline and doxycycline on some blood parameters related to liver function.

Serevent accuhaler price


Its piggishly evecare uk range of products exhibit known biological activities that have found uses in a wide array of research fields, especially cancer and neuroscience. If any provision of the Terms of Use is found by a court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid, the parties nevertheless agree that the court should endeavor to give effect to the parties' intentions as reflected in the provision, and the other provisions of the Terms of Use remain in full force and effect. Risolvere crescente problema della resistenza agli le proprie opportunità per. On careprost buy online amazon forwardly Day 11, the best-corrected spectacle visual acuity (BCSVA) had improved to 20/30 with further pinhole improvement to 20/25! Lisinopril - Bula para o Paciente• Ação esperada do medicamento: o uso contínuo de Lisinopril controla a pressão arterial e a insufi ciência cardíaca congestiva, serevent for coughing diminuindo o risco de hospitalização e mortalidade. Available online at http://wwwwebmdcom/drugs/drug-4358-Digoxin+Oralaspxdrugid=4358&drugname=Digoxin+Oral. The major circulating metabolite is the methylcatechol glucuronide! Other causes: rheumatic fever and that we are unproven. Hyvarinen, buy serevent Cortical neuronal mecha- nisms in flutter-vibration studied in unanesthetized monkeys? Lisinopril does not mention it protects kidneys however bloodpressure in control does and that is with any person. During terramycin eye ointment price acquiescently pregnancy, infancy, and childhood, the body needs zinc to grow and develop properly? It seems that there are many autistic children whose problems started soon after long-term antibiotic therapy, serevent gravid or whose mothers had chronic yeast infections which they had passed along to the infants? Il viso è spianato, rischiarato e la piega verticale tra le sopracciglia è diminuita?

The Real “Secret” to Successful Social Media Marketing For Your Business

There’s a not-so-secret truth to social media marketing that no one ever likes hearing.

What people always want to hear about, and read about, is two distinct parts:

1) Getting set up on social media channels. All of them. At once!

2) Growing your audience. Quickly. Or getting likes. Or comments. All quickly, of course.

For the first thing, getting set up is often fairly easy. The basics haven’t really changed. You upload a picture, you fill in your profile, done. Sort of.

The part that always makes me, and any social media manager worth their salt, shake their head is the request for more followers, faster, with likes and comments and shares, oh my!

But without any of that pesky work. Folks just want followers, and fast. Isn’t there a tool for that? Can’t you just buy a few followers? When you get the followers, then they all go to your website, and then they buy stuff.

That’s how it works, right?

social media for business

The truth no one likes hearing about social media marketing: it’s not fast, and it’s not easy.

There’s this mistaken idea that because so many of us use social media for our personal lives, doing it for work must be a piece of cake.

Wrong.

Social media for business is hard. You have to think about what you say and share in what is often an entirely different light than normal.

When you’re posting for business, it’s not for you. You’re representing the business. The statuses you share, the images, the links, all of it needs to feel like the business’s “voice”, and it needs to follow the business’s brand guidelines.

You have to spend your time looking for posts related to your industry, interacting with people in that industry, and otherwise attempting to exude endless enthusiasm about topics such as telecom expense management, logistics, or human resources strategies.

While those things might be what your place of work specializes in, they’re rarely things that you as a human find fascinating enough to want to spend entire chunks of your day working on every single day. Chances are, you, and most other people in your office, struggle to find the time or interest to work on social media after the initial push of setting up accounts.

The real secret to social media success is surprisingly mundane.

I’m telling you this after 10 years of social media marketing.

Use a social media scheduling tool.

Seriously, yes, that’s it.

Use a tool like Hootsuite, or Buffer, or Sprout Social, or even embrace Hubspot’s social media tool. It doesn’t matter what tool you use, as long as you’re comfortable with it, and you stick to it.

Set aside an hour or two a week to schedule your content, and just do it all at once. Let the tool actually do the posting for you.

The reason this works is that it takes the pressure off to log in every day and fake it. Instead, it’s just another task for you to check off your regular weekly workload. Doing it all at once also ensures you don’t miss a day.

It’s not the end of the world to skip a day here and there, but what happens all too often is that skipping one day turns into two, three, or weeks at a time. Then, whoever’s been saddled with being the makeshift social media manager tries to fix it by posting 10 statuses at once.

That doesn’t work either.

Just start using a status scheduling tool, and let it handle that for you.

After that, you’ll still need to log in at least once a day to engage, but that’s something easier than posting. Typically, you can get your routine engagement tasks done in under 15 minutes!

Through efficient use of a scheduling tool, plus daily sprints of engagement, you can get your social media management tasks down to just a couple hours total a week. You get the benefits of routine posting on social media, without losing hours a day or an entire day a week to trying to make it work.

It really can become that easy – it just takes turning it into a routine. 

Social Media for Business: Yes, You Have to Work on It Every Day

Social media is a strange thing.

Many of us, especially those of younger generations (*cough* millennials *cough*), interact on social media nearly every day, multiple times a day. We log in, we check what other people post, we post things ourselves, and generally spend plenty of time looking at our preferred social media sites.

Most of us have developed a habit of posting fairly regularly, including commenting and liking other people’s posts on a daily basis. We also realize that if we don’t interact with other people’s stuff, they’re less likely to interact with ours.

So why is it when people get to work, they completely forget all of this?

social media for business

You can’t just hop on social media when it’s convenient and expect results.

This isn’t directed at the social media managers or digital marketing managers of the world. You guys know what I’m talking about. You’ve probably been fighting an uphill battle with upper management about frequency and content types for months.

Other people’s content is a good, useful, and helpful thing.

This is me pointing right at you, C-suite, sales guy, and everyone else in the building.

Social media is a daily thing.

You have to post consistently, you have to interact daily, and you have to give if you want to receive.

Each network has a frequency that works best for it, but posting daily and logging in to interact is an essential part of social media management. This is especially true on the most popular business network, LinkedIn. If you’re not logging in and interacting with people daily, you’re just plain not going to see the same benefits as someone who’s consistently active.

social media for business selfie

More isn’t always better, either.

Sometimes, people get the idea that they can just log in and post everything at once, especially when they first get started with social media marketing.

“I have all this great content! I’ll just share it all – then people can click on what they like, right?”

While that is a great idea in theory, in practice, you’ll just look like your spamming the feed of anyone you’re connected with. You’re more likely to make people unfriend or unfollow you as a result of posting so much at once.

I keep harping on the whole idea of “consistency”, but that’s really where you want to focus.

You need to remember the cardinal rule of social media and the internet as a whole:

We’re all on here for ourselves. As humans, we are selfish, self centered, and we’re only going to spend time on the things that benefit ourselves.

You have to provide something of value in order for people to want to see what you share.

When it’s our personal social media channels, that thing of value is ourselves, which may be why it’s so hard for people to shift gears in a business setting. Among your friends and family, sharing pictures of your dogs, your food, and your opinions on the oxford comma are enjoyed because those people know you and care about you.

Among strangers?

Strangers are unlikely to care one bit about you unless they have a reason. Cute puppy pictures can be that reason, but strangers are unlikely to care about the chicken you made for dinner, nor are they likely to give your opinion about commas much weight.

This is even more true for businesses.

Think about it. How much do you care what a complete stranger shares about their day?

How much do you care about a business sharing their latest press release? Unless you’re directly affected by their latest acquisition or product release, you probably don’t care one whit about some business’s press release.

Social media is an investment of time, not money.

An important shift in the way to look at social media is that it requires a different sort of investment than other types of marketing.

You don’t just throw money at it. Just like investing in other areas, throwing money at social media (through ads, sponsoring content, or boosted posts) is unlikely to provide you with noticeable results.

You do need to invest time in it, but just like money, you can’t just “throw” time at social media and expect it to work.

You need a strategy, and you need to dedicate time to it on a regular basis.

Why Sales and Marketing Don’t Get Along – and How to Fix It

It’s a common trope.

Sales and marketing just don’t get along.

There’s always some reason for it – marketing always sends crap leads to sales, or sales is always asking marketing for something they can’t deliver.

But it’s never the fault of the department who’s complaining. If you’re hearing sales complain about marketing, it’s all marketing’s fault. If it’s marketing complaining about sales, it’s all sales’ fault.

Whose fault is it really? It can’t be a blameless occurrence; someone has to be screwing up somewhere (and often) for there to be such stark lines drawn in the sand.

sales and marketing dont get along

How about this: It’s the fault of BOTH departments.

That’s exactly right, it’s not a blameless occurrence. Both departments are a bit to blame.

Some of it is company culture, and a rigid mindset as people get older.

I’m not talking older like baby boomers or gen X – I’m talking my own generation, millennials, as we move from our early 20s to our 30s. All of us are guilty of this, from the bright eyed and bushy tailed new hires to seasoned and experienced veterans of any company.

The practice of most mid to large sized companies is generally to silo marketing and sales apart from each other, rarely having either department interact aside from mid to upper management. It’s also rare that any of us make it to our 30s and onward without ever working for a company that does this – sooner or later, we’ll all end up with a stint at a company that wants sales and marketing to never ever interfere with what the other department is doing.

This mindset is at the heart of why sales and marketing don’t get along.

sales and marketing

When you only hang out with your own team, it’s easy to blame the other team.

Some of the issue is that we tend to stick to “our own kind”, especially if a company has an old school internal structure.

If a company is keeping sales and marketing isolated from each other, it’s easy to blame the other department when things don’t go right. I’ve heard sales guys complain that they hated marketing teams because “marketing always said no!” to their ideas. I’ve heard marketing complain that they’re fed up with sales because sales never uses the software/content/leads that marketing provides.

When sales isn’t meeting quota, they feel the crunch – and it’s easy to blame marketing for not sending them enough leads, or not doing a good enough job with the brand awareness. When sales has great ideas for getting more leads, marketing shoots them down (they don’t have time for the flavor of the month!), making the sales team feel like they’re not able to try anything new.

When marketing doesn’t get bonuses, or when they’re getting leaned on by management for not increasing numbers, it’s easy to blame sales for not doing anything with all the perfectly good leads they do send. Marketing is likely to get frustrated that sales won’t stick to the sales process that marketing is trying to follow, or that sales drops the warm leads they feel that they keep sending.

Why would marketing want to try a new process or tool when sales can’t even stick to the current one?

Neither department is wrong. Sure, marketing could probably send sales more leads. And sure, sales could probably do more with the leads that marketing does send.

It’d be great if sales had more flexibility in the tools or processes they could try, and it’d also be great if the hand-off from marketing to sales went as smooth as butter.

But the thing is, it doesn’t need to be so exclusive. It doesn’t need to be that marketing just gets leads. It doesn’t need to be that sales is the only department that can work those leads.

Let your sales and marketing teams blend together.

The way to fix the bickering between sales and marketing is to remove the walls between them.

Make it so that sales and marketing aren’t isolated from each other.

Make it easy for them to talk to each other – and give them a clear direction to go in.

In particular, tie both sales and marketing to very specific goals. Be clear that the two departments have to work together to demonstrate their progress towards those goals. Utilizing a tool like Hubspot allows you to associate closed deals with specific campaigns and activities – meaning that both sales and marketing can clearly see the impact that their actions have on revenue.

The ability to measure campaigns against revenue is a new analytic option within Hubspot, but with a CRM that tracks emails, clicks, social media statuses, blog content, and forms, you can mimic that capability.

Even without the campaign analytics tool, you can still give marketing and sales a revenue target and the leeway to strive towards it.

By making it a joint venture, you gently force them to work together. Sales can try and achieve it alone, but they’ll have a significantly harder time than if they embrace the insight and information that marketing can give them. Marketing will have the ability to assign concrete numbers to their work, giving them quality feedback on what is or isn’t working.

sales and marketing get along

Sales and marketing need to stop being isolated from each other.

The more you open up communication between the two teams, the better your business will perform. A marketing team that’s familiar with the sales process, common sales techniques, and the general principles of sales is one that will work beautifully with your sales team.

Conversely, a sales team that understands basic marketing principles will also be able to utilize the tools and opportunities that marketing provides them.

It’s not that either team is trying to make life harder for the other, or that either team wants the other to fail – they just seldom get shoved together enough to play nice.

It takes some work, especially at first, but the end result is a stronger, more effective team.

Social Media for Business: the Difference Between Instagram and Twitter Hashtags

Social media is confusing regardless of what generation you’re a part of. If you haven’t dedicated time to learning each network and the communities within them, they can seem like a complex club you didn’t learn the code words for. That’s true for millennials, Gen Xers, and baby boomers alike – unfamiliarity breeds confusion.

One area that’s confusing to someone just starting out is understanding hashtags. They mean one thing on Twitter, another thing on Instagram, and you can use them on Facebook and LinkedIn but hardly anyone does.

Hashtags don’t have to be difficult, though.

Hashtags on Twitter

Understanding the use of hashtags on Twitter is probably the easiest way to start.

On Twitter, hashtags are essentially ways of sorting similar content. A hashtag on Twitter is little more than a keyword or a Google search term. You can turn anything into a hashtag, but you need to be cautious when you do so.

For example, take Lean manufacturing. The concept of Lean in business is fairly well known, and commonly used in offices all over the world.

But on Twitter?

When you try using the word “Lean” as a hashtag, you get drug references and slang terms, as well as the common use of the word in regular language.

A hashtag operates like a search, and collects tweets with same word or hashtag together in a searchable way. Unlike Google search, though, it’s not nearly as smart. You get anything and everything related to that word.

 

Smiling couple taking selfie on mobile phone in cafeteria

 

Hashtags on Instagram

On Instagram, hashtags work in a different way.

On the surface, they’re the same. Hashtags are a way to organize content and find related content.

But on Instagram, it’s all about images.

With that in mind, hashtags work a different way. In fact, they work multiple ways. This is due, in part, because Instagram has an algorithm that it uses to display images which isn’t purely based on when things were posted. Compared to Twitter, posts have a much longer life (although the largest portion of engagements will happen in the first hour or two you post something).

That longer life means hashtags can do more. They can:

  • Act as a way collect images about a similar event, item, topic, or person
  • Act as a way for community members to find each other’s posts and interact with them
  • Act as a way for people and brands to talk about specific topics
  • Act as a way for discovery about specific topics

When you use a hashtag on Instagram, it’s part of a longer conversation. On Twitter, it’s a much more ephemeral thing – Tweets can be posted and forgotten in the space of an hour.

On Instagram, you can search for those images for days, weeks, or even months later.

At their heart, hashtags on both Instagram and Twitter are used the same way.

The essence of hashtags for both platforms is the same.

They’re ways of collecting and organizing data.

The main difference is that Instagram is all about storing images; Twitter is about sharing thoughts.

If your hashtags on Instagram aren’t performing as well as what you’re used to with Twitter, it’s probably a combination of not selecting the right hashtags, and poor photo skills.

Twitter just requires a clicky headline, and using a hashtag that’s associated with the right topics. Hashtags can trend and stop trending in a matter of hours, around seemingly arbitrary phrases.

Instagram is slower acting. Hashtags occur more like incidental collections around popular places, topics, and trends. The bigger a hashtag gets, the bigger it continues to get.

Additionally, you can use more hashtags on Instagram than Twitter – up to 30 per post. Compared to Twitter, where best practice is use only one or two, that’s significantly more opportunities to be found by the little communities and niches that ‘live’ on Instagram.

Twitter is where people go for news. Instagram is for images and community.

If you’re struggling to see success with your Instagram efforts despite all the hashtags in the world, there’s probably a hard truth you need to consider:

Your images probably suck.

I’m not saying you’re a terrible person or that you’re incapable of seeing success if you’re bad at taking pictures, but if you really want to succeed with Instagram, your pictures need to be top notch.

There’s a ton of competition on Instagram, and your content has to be as good or better to compete.

All the hashtags in the world won’t make someone want to look at pictures of your logo in different colors, or your 10th selfie of the week with a different filter on it.

If you’re using Instagram for business, you have to ask yourself whether or not you’d want to look at what you’re posting if you were a stranger. If you weren’t directly involved with what you’re posting, would you care?

As with any new social media network, take your time looking around and determining how businesses like yours are operating on the channel. Look for businesses or people in that niche that are successful, and what they do. Look also for those who get minimal engagement on their posts, and think critically about the differences.

Good luck!

How to Get Customers to Participate In a Case Study

Sales is always begging you for more case studies, but you just can’t seem to get any of YOUR customers to agree to a case study. Sales is right: case studies are among your best content options, serving as impartial proof points of the value you bring to your customers. They can be used early in the marketing funnel for lead generation and are also key late in the sales cycle to provide evidence needed to close a deal. But they can be tricky to get buy-in for, particularly in highly competitive environments. Here are our 5 no-fail tips on how to get customers to participate in a case study, and make you a marketing hero.

1. Don’t Leave It Up to Sales

Sales never wants outsiders to “bother” their client. Any time marketing or PR asks for them for an introduction once the deal is in progress, the answer will be something like this, “it isn’t a good time. We have…” Fill in the blank… “it’s not a good time… there’s an issue with the new feature… we need to wait before we clean up an issue.”

You can avoid this situation by Marketing or PR getting introduced into the client relationship early on so that they have a direct, non-sales relationship. This will keep the case study request and approval process completely outside of the sales discussion and prevent that case study from being used as leverage in a negotiation by the client. Once you start doing this as a matter of course, it will feel natural to sales and they’ll be comfortable that you’ll keep the sales and marketing worlds separate in the client’s eyes.

2. Start Early

Too often a case study request comes along very late in the relationship, even several years down the line. The champion may have moved on, the original reason or benchmark for the purchase forgotten, and the new day-to-day users and point of contact are too low in the organization to want to stick their neck out. What we see most often is that without the original value prop and data, the ROI is hard to back into several years down the road. Starting early lets you build a clear “before” and “after” picture.

Make it clear up front that you want to partner with the client and work with them to develop the story. Get the Marketing and PR introductions made right away. Put together a timeline and outline of desired outcomes. Gather relevant baseline information and hold a preliminary “interview” to get their viewpoints on the facts of the story. This also lets your client feel like that have control of the output. Then be sure to make contact at specific milestone points to continue to gather information and keep track of your contacts.

Unposed group of creative business people in an open concept office brainstorming their next project.

 

3. Make it a Win for Them

The ideal candidate to work with on a case study is either an internal champion or a company that has some big ambitions. It’s much harder to get a “yes” out of someone who is low risk. However, there are many category leaders or innovators who would love to have some extra press, and internal champions who would like a little visibility and career boost around a winning project. Look for companies who are on fast growth trajectories or cutting new paths and who are already doing a lot of their own PR and you’ll find they are more likely to want to be featured as doing something “smart” in their industry. Similarly, there are rising stars in companies who are eager for a little limelight and would appreciate being named as part of a successful initiative.

4. Make it Easy for Them

Another form of a case study is the award. Often that looks like a better option to a client, but the end result is the same for you – a piece of content connecting your name and a customer’s. Take the work off your client’s shoulders when it comes to the writing. Be willing to do the leg work, write content drafts, interview participants, collecting up the details, and work with media. Awards also give you opportunity for follow-on stories, social media, etc. The trick is to submit your customer as the starring role. Remember, it’s about them, not you. And that increases the likelihood of winning. Hardly anyone will turn down the opportunity to be a star in THEIR industry. The good news for you is that once it’s published, you can congratulate them publically.

5. Make it (almost) impossible to say “no” when you ask customers to participate in a case study

Case studies don’t have to be an all or nothing proposition. A named case study is always preferable, but the fall back could be a generic case study (if you didn’t already get them to agree to be interviewed, participate on a panel, or be submitted for an award). Industry relevant stats and benchmarks are always useful to sales and interesting to prospects.

If you do all 5 of these steps, you’ll have more “yes’s” when you ask your customers to participate in a case study and sales will love you!

Our Guest Blogger is Kathleen Glass, founder and CEO of Oinkodomeo.

5 Reasons Why Your Online Marketing Isn’t Working

You clicked through to this post for a reason.

There’s something not working in your digital marketing.

You’re not getting clicks, you’re not getting website traffic, and worst of all, you’re not getting leads.

No leads, no closed deals, no revenue, no ROI.

The worst part is that you can’t figure out why. You’re ticking all the boxes: you post blogs, you have an account on every social media platform and you post every day. What else are you supposed to be doing?

Here’s a few of the possible reasons that your online marketing might not be working the way you’d hoped.

1) You’re trying a little of everything without a real strategy in place.

While being open to experimentation is good, you don’t want to just try everything you read on the internet all at once.

You need to have a reason for each initiative you try. You need a way to measure the success, or failure, of each experiment.

If you try 5 things at once, if one of them works, you won’t which it was. If you don’t know what worked, you won’t know what you should focus on to keep it working. You also won’t know what’s not working – and not worth your time to keep investing effort into.

Think about it in terms of hours: assume you only spend an hour on each marketing initiative that’s an experiment.

You spend 1 hour each on 5 different things, but when one works, you’re not sure which thing you should attribute the success to.

That’s 5 hours, but only one hour is actually benefiting your business.

Imagine if you spent all 5 of those hours on the thing that was working. What would you be able to scale if you could do that?

What if, on the flip side, one of the things you’re trying is failing? What if there’s something that’s actually working against your marketing efforts?

When you have 5 experiments going and something is working just enough that you see results, you won’t be able to tell which it is – or if there’s something hampering you from even more success.

So focus on one thing at a time, and make sure you budget enough time to test that thing thoroughly.

why digital marketing isn't working

2) You went too big and broad with your strategy.

You spent the time to create a strategy, but you didn’t actually adapt and refine it.

Your strategy, rather than being broad and becoming refined, simply stayed broad. It’s not documented, and it’s not terribly specific: your digital marketing strategy is basically “get more leads”.

Yeah but…how?

You blog?

You post to Facebook, and Twitter, and LinkedIn?

Why?

Have you figured out how to utilize your blog for attracting leads searching for what you offer?

Have you figured out which networks your leads are active on – and why they’re active there?

Have you set up experiments to figure out what works, and why? Apply what you learn to your overall strategy to continually refine and improve it.

3) Your website hasn’t been improved or even updated in years.

Content marketing and digital marketing can work even with an outdated, clunky website, but it’s harder and harder for you to see success if your site isn’t keeping up with Google’s algorithm changes.

Your site needs to be mobile friendly, responsive, fast, and follow Google’s best practices for search relevancy.

If you haven’t updated your site in years, chances are, you’re not as competitive as you think when it comes to SEO, search, and the almighty Google.

4) You create content, but then you do nothing with it.

It’s not enough to publish a blog or whitepaper, and then plop it on your website.

Unless you actually try and do something with it, it’s going to accomplish very little for you.

You’ll need to share it to social media, link to it within other pieces of content, and incorporate it into your Adwords and PPC efforts.

Figure out how that content fits in to your overall sales enablement efforts, and make sure it’s easily accessible and searchable for your sales team.

Make sure you’ve identified where in the sales cycle that content fits. You can repurpose content, recycle it into multiple platforms, and get more life out of it than as one simple post.

5) The harsh truth is that your content sucks.

When you’re doing everything right but still not getting leads or site traffic, there’s an excellent chance that there’s an underlying issue you’ve been trying not to see.

It’s that what you’re writing sucks.

No one wants to read self-promoting dribble. No one wants to read your lousy, “we’re the best at this” blog.

Someone may want to read your technical breakdown of how the code behind your product works, but that someone is an engineer trying to solve a technical problem. They’re not someone who’s looking for a new solution, or someone likely to purchase a new solution.

You need to be writing content that’s relevant to people who are searching for solutions. It needs to be at least a little interesting, and it needs to genuinely help the reader solve a problem. It needs to not be self promotional dribble, and it needs to be easy to read.

Is your blog all of those things?

Are you sure?

Stop reading this blog, and go take a hard look at your content.

If you stopped here long enough to read this blog, it’s because you’re concerned that you’re doing something wrong with your content marketing.

The short answer to that question is yes, you are.

The way to solve that issue?

Work at it.

 

The ROI of Outsourcing Your Marketing: When to Outsource, and When to Stay In-House

Depending on the size of your business and your marketing budget, the decision of what parts of your marketing strategy to outsource can be easy – or very difficult.

If you have zero marketing efforts and plan on continuing to do nothing, then the answer is easy: why bother?

If your business has a huge focus on marketing, and a dedicated team already, then it’s also an easier answer: why outsource what your in-house team can handle?

But if you’re somewhere inbetween zero marketing and having a full marketing department with teams, the decision isn’t as easy.

I’ll outline some easy outsourcing wins for you, as well as some items that probably could – and should – remain in house.

b2b marketing outsourced

Things to Outsource:

1: Blogging.

While yes, getting the senior management, design team, or engineers to be involved with blogging is important, it’s extremely likely that none of them are going to be experienced, talented bloggers.

You pay them to do something else: accounting, designing, or engineering your product, to name a few.

So why force them to write a blog, pay for that time, and lose out on their productivity in the thing they’re actually good at?

Instead, pay for a well written blog from an experienced content writer. Whether it’s by the word, the hour, or a flat rate per blog post, they are going to be better at writing, faster at writing, and cheaper than your own team trying to force content to happen.

Additionally, when you have an editorial calendar, you can source key people within your company to provide the topics and basic background information, and have your blog writers prepare their blogs well in advance.

This leads to consistency in your post timing, which leads to increased SERP ranking, and overall, all those good things you were hoping to get from blogging in the first place.

For a dedicated content writer, you’re looking at about $42,000 a year, annual salary, if you wanted to hire one. That’s $3500 a month, give or take.

Compare that to a blog writer, an expensive one, at $400 per post (you can often get blogs for less), and you’re paying only $1600 a month – and you don’t have to pay the overhead that’s associated with a full time employee.

2: Social Media Management

Much like blogging, your team is not going to be as good at setting up and managing social media as an experienced social media manager.

There is significantly more to social than simply posting to each channel once a day, 3 times a day, or in some poor, misguided cases, 10 times a day.

However, unlike blogging, it’s harder to get an effective social media management team that can also function as first line customer service AND nurture leads for you. You’ll need to set up a “chain of command”, of sorts, to ensure an outsourced social media manager or team can be effective.

If you can set up a key point of contact for customer service/support questions, as well as a separate contact for sales, you’ll be 2 steps ahead of 90% of B2B marketers out there. That’s true even if you keep social in house! It’s far too common for businesses to just wing it, because customer service or leads generated from social in B2B is a much less frequent occurrence than in B2C.

In B2B, you’ll want a social media manager, or team, that specializes in B2B. Your necessary tactics and strategies are different than B2C, and they’ll need to be aware of this.

That’s also why you should definitely be outsourcing social media management if the only person managing your social media is also the front desk girl, someone’s assistant, or just whoever you thought had the time to do it. It’s one thing to enjoy Facebook on your personal time, but another thing entirely to try and generate leads through the platform.

For that reason, it’s actually much cheaper, overall, to hire a social media manager or small agency to manage your social, rather than pay for a dedicated professional.

Hiring a social media manager to your team full time: anywhere from $45,000 a year to $61,000 a year, depending on the region and skill of the employee.

Compare that to outsourcing, which for B2B, is anywhere from $1,000 to $1,500 a month.

For the cost of your full time copywriter, you could outsource all blog writing AND your social media management – two key digital marketing needs, one stone.

3: Advertising – on Social Platforms or through Paid Search

Google Adwords is such a complex platform that there are literally 5 different tests to pass to be qualified, on a very basic level, as being knowledgeable about the tool in specific niches. Beyond that, actually seeing results requires more than just passing the tests.

Unfortunately, outsourcing this aspect is difficult. The lower cost agency options are, to put it bluntly, often just plain lousy. They generate minimal results for astronomical ad spends, and tend to shrug off a lack of significant ROI.

Facebook advertising has zero certifications or testing required to claim yourself as a Facebook advertiser, but it’s no less complicated than Google’s Adwords – it’s just complicated in its own, unique way.

Both platforms do require a minimum budget of at least $1,000 a month to see initial results.

And both platforms do require testing to try and figure out what works.

Because of this, you need to be working very closely with your advertising agency or consultant. They need to know your goals, and you need to have a very clear attribution model and funnel for the traffic they attract to travel through your site.

Unlike social media marketing or copywriting/content writing, there’s really minimal need to hire a dedicated PPC specialist unless your company is in the Fortune 500 – or you’re spending tens of thousands of dollars a month in paid search. The average salary for a PPC manager is nearly $50,000, right in line with the other specialist marketing managers you could be hiring.

Instead of hiring someone dedicated, or trying to get your poor, overworked in-house marketing everything person to handle your advertising, do the research into an experienced PPC agency or consultant. You’ll save on more than just the salary, you’ll also have a more effective ad spend.

Outsourcing allows you the skills of a full team without having to pay for keeping them all to yourself.

Instead of spending your entire marketing budget on a team, focus on finding and cultivating a positive relationship with an agency (or two) that handles your key outsourced needs effectively.

There’s no reason to hire three people when you don’t have enough work to keep them busy full time. On top of that, why force a generalist to try and do the work of three specialists? You might get by for a while, but the general marketing performance will never equal that of what an agency (or even specialized consultant) could have done for you – and for less.

Things to hire an in-house person for:

1 – Marketing Coordination

As you start moving into multiple agencies, contractors, and/or tools, you need someone within your company dedicated to keeping them all working together and on task.

That’s what a Marketing Coordinator does.

Because the workload of making everything happen is genuinely something that will fill an entire 8 hour workday, it’s worth hiring someone to be in your office to take care of this.

Your marketing coordinator should be a skilled and democratic person accustomed to having to herd cats (consultants), and capable of keeping a smile on their face while they do so.  Someone with project management experience or a project management mindset can also be an asset in this role.

2 – First Line Customer Support

While this can be outsourced to a certain extent for social media, it’s honestly best to have at least one person immersed in your company for the front line of customer service.

The questions are often varied and complex, and trying to document this for an outsourced contractor is a massive task that, let’s face it, will never get properly done.

First line customer support often has high turnover, and it’s typically an entry level role in just about any company. While outsourcing entry level roles can be cheaper, again, for the sake of your brand message and ease of management, just hiring someone in-house is likely to be the better option.

3 – CMO / Head of Marketing

If you’re big enough to have a budget to support a small outsourced team, as well as at least one marketing coordinator, you should probably look into someone who can genuinely own the marketing side of your business.

This generally means at least a Director of Marketing, if not a full-blown CMO.

The reason to invest in this person is that they’ll drive strategy for the company, and steer the rest of your marketing efforts in the direction they need to go. They need to be in-house, because then they’re directly invested in your company. Their attention won’t be split between multiple clients or projects – it’ll be focused entirely on driving new business for your business.

Make sure that your head of marketing is someone who does big picture, not the day to day, and provide them with the budget to outsource as needed. Don’t hire a junior manager and give them a director title, and expect the results to be the same as actually hiring a marketing director who knows what to do – and why they should do it.

Understanding the ‘why’ behind marketing tactics is one of the biggest reasons to invest in an experienced marketing strategist for your head of marketing.

Start small with your outsourced efforts, and grow your consulting team slowly.

Before you jump into paying for three or four different contractors to handle different content and advertising needs for your company, start with just one.

Find out what kind of cadence works best with the first contractor (or agency) you’re trying to work with, and whether or not the work arrangement is something that is benefitting your business.

Do you need to hire a marketing coordinator sooner, rather than later? Should you just let the coordinator do the contractor hiring? What budget should you set for contractors and content?

All of these questions might be asked and decided ahead of time, but the reality of making it work may blow your plans right out of the water.

Keyword Strategy for Business: Why the Obvious Choices Aren’t the Best Choices

Keywords, what they mean, and what matters about them are ever changing, complicated topics. Because of this, many business websites are dearly lacking in appropriate, targeted keyword strategies.

But why is that?

Your business is probably targeting the keywords you think it should. If you’re in logistics, you’re probably targeting supply chain, logistics, and third party logistics.

If you’re in TEM, you’re probably targeting telecom expense management.

If you’re in SaaS, you’re probably targeting words directly related to the software, or service, you’re providing.

If you’re spending money on Adwords for those words, you’re probably spending a pretty penny on each click. TEM related words can be as much as $20 a click, logistics nearly as high, and SaaS can be easily $5 to $10 a click for the very specific words related to your industries.

While yes, you want to rank for those very specific, very targeted words, do you really want to be spending $15 to $20 a click for visits that may not convert, may not be actual leads, or who may even be competitors who wanted to check out your landing pages?

That’s where a more strategic keyword (and SEO) plan comes into play.

picking better keywords b2b

Great Keywords Come From Understanding Your Buyer

An often touted diagram for Inbound Marketing is the buyer’s journey: Awareness, Consideration, Decision.

When you pay for, and target, specifically branded keywords that are exactly what your business offers, you’re targeting your efforts toward buyers in the decision stage of their buying journey. Those are the buyers who are deciding on what solution to buy, which is why their clicks are so expensive.

However, there’s plenty of buyers (more, usually) who are earlier in their buyer’s journey. They’re just becoming aware that they have a problem, and that there may be a solution (awareness stage), or they’re looking at their options for solving that problem (consideration stage).

Because the buyers in the awareness stage aren’t sure of what they want, the words and phrases they use to search are extremely varied. Those keywords are also cheap.

That’s because all of your competitors are targeting all those decision stage buyers, thinking that those are the only people they should be trying to sway with their marketing.

But that’s wrong.

Decision stage buyers have already decided on the options they’re choosing between.

If you’ve attracted a decision stage buyer, they made most of that decision before ever talking to your sales team. They already found you, somehow, some way, and considered your business as an option already.

Decision stage buyers are important, but targeting them is expensive – and potentially futile. These people already know what they want, whether that is or isn’t you.

So why chase them?

Awareness stage buyers are further away from making a decision, which makes for a long sales cycle, but if you start influencing them at the beginning of that cycle…as they move along, considering options, your business becomes that primary consideration.

Ranking highly and answer questions in the awareness stage leads to an easier time ranking for the buyers that are in the consideration stage.

Those buyers are the ones you want to be converting on your site, the ones you want sales to be in touch with.

which keywords to target for b2b

Determining Which Keywords You Should Target

If you’ve never thought about how your best leads might be searching for you, then now is the time to start.

Use Google’s auto-complete to figure out which phrases are the most common, typing in the words that first come to mind. Additionally, try using a Keyword Tool (Keywords Everywhere is my current favorite) to see the number of searches and the cost per click of those words.

Then, sit in with your sales team more.

Find out what questions they’re commonly answering for prospects. Are there common themes among those questions? Could you be providing easy answers on your website?

Think through the problems you solve for your customers.

What are questions they should be asking, even if you don’t always hear prospects asking them directly?

Try typing those questions into Google, experimenting with combinations until you start finding words or phrases that get a dozen to a hundred searches each month.

Don’t be afraid to get granular, either. As a practical example, let’s look at a software as a service company. They provide software that assists with accounting and invoicing, and their tool is most effective with B2B businesses.

Instead of targeting words like “accounting software” or “invoicing software”, they take time to understand their audience. They know that their audience is usually small to mid sized companies, and that the audience is usually shopping for an invoicing solution when the office manager changes, or when they first start hiring more office employees. That’s because they’re growing – or the new office manager wants to try something other than ‘the way its always been done’.

So instead of targeting just “accounting software”, they target phrases a new office manager is likely to be looking up as they get settled. Templates, errors, and overhauls are common first searches, as managers in any capacity try to figure out what’s going on and how they can fix the issues they’ve inherited.

Instead of “invoice software” at $12.46 a click for only 12,000 extremely competitive searches, they can try “invoice templates” at $5.09 a click, with over 200,000 searches that are half as competitive.

Instead of “accounting software” at $8.98 a click for over 60,000 searches, and competition even higher than “invoice software”, there’s other indicators that someone needs improvements in their accounting software. “Accounting error” has only 1300 searches, but cost per click is under $1, and there’s next to no competition. “Payroll mistake” is basically free, which is likely due to only getting about a dozen or so searches a month.

Any business looking up accounting errors or payroll mistakes probably needs a software that helps them.

See what I’m getting at?

What would your perfect customer be searching for that is a sign they have a problem?

Those are the keywords you should target, and the type of content you should be creating.

TEM and Twitter: How to Actually Use Twitter for Prospecting

No, Twitter isn’t going to fix the lack of leads pouring into your sales pipeline.

But it will help you expand your networking capabilities. Twitter is hugely underestimated in Telecom, especially by upper management and sales teams. They don’t want to learn it, and they don’t want to deal with something “new” – but spoiler alert, Twitter has been around for over a decade now.

It’s not new, it’s not dying, and in sales, if you’re not using Twitter, you’re a dinosaur.

Traditional sales teams value outbound calls, “feet on pavement”, and cold-calling (en masse) sales tactics.

And those tactics can work.

But are they working well enough?

As Josh Harcus notes in “A Closing Culture”, this is because often, cold outbound sales still works some of the time – maybe, if you’re lucky, up to 20% of those outbound calls result in connecting with leads. Why fix what isn’t broken?

The thing is, those tactics are broken.

To paraphrase Josh’s example from his book, think of sales like a fishing net on a fishing trawler. A fish net that has holes in it, catching fish at 20% capacity, would be considered a broken net. Sure, you’re still catching some fish – which may be bringing in enough revenue to keep the boat afloat, and not much else. Why wouldn’t you fix the net?

By viewing outbound sales as working “good enough” when you’re only connecting to 20% of the possible leads you’re trying to reach, you’re acting like that fishing boat trying to make a profit with a net full of holes.

twitter for telecom expense managment

Instead of relying on only one tactic, try utilizing multiple to keep your sales funnel full.

There are plenty of additional tactics that can help keep your sales funnel full.

One of the best is using social media effectively to increase the reach of your message, as well as demonstrate your influence.

Twitter is an excellent social media channel for telecom expense management, especially their sales teams, if used appropriately. It’s a way to connect with conference attendees before an event, to increase the reach of your networking efforts, and a way to keep in touch with people you may not have been able to reach otherwise.

To do that, you need to not be terrible at Twitter. You also need to not be hated by everyone who ends up following you, which is harder than it might seem.

Utilizing Twitter as a method for increasing your networking reach means viewing it not as a platform for you to broadcast at people – it’s an extension of your networking efforts.

You go to conferences and networking events to connect with people, right? You have tons of short conversations with the goal of gaining at least a handful of meaningful connections that lead to a sale.

There’s a social media network dedicated to doing that all day, every day, with millions of people actively using it.

That’s Twitter.

twitter to prospect for leads

Using Twitter to Attract Leads Instead of Hunting them Down

Easy enough to say, but how do you actually do that?

Before you start using Twitter for leads and prospecting, take some time to be sure you’ve set it up properly. Click here for my Twitter optimization guide – come back when you’ve done all of that.

Next, set up your posting routine. Aim for 3 posts a day at first, with at least 2 being of “someone else’s content” – AKA curated content. When it comes to this content, think of what your prospective customers would care about. Industry news, changes in regulations, technology updates…these are all excellent topics for sharing on Twitter.

When in doubt, look to accounts you enjoy following. You can retweet their tweets, or visit the links and share the posts themselves.

I suggest retweeting the tweets of your favorite accounts, though – it’s a good way to try and build a relationship with an influencer in your space. In TEM, there’s plenty of small-scale influencers. They’re not going to be accounts the size of Justin Beiber, but they’re just as influential when it comes to recommending companies and budgets.

Influencer marketing is an entirely different ball game, but you can take advantage of some of the benefits businesses see with bigger, paid, influencer marketing campaigns. Being friendly with the “big names” online means their audience sees you, and potentially you gain followers or even leads as a result. At the very worst, you get a boost in SEO, reach, or a bit of influence-by-association.

Just like being able to walk up to one of the well known industry names at an AOTMP or TEMIA conference instantly puts you up there as another person worth knowing, being connected to them online nets you similar benefits on a smaller scale.

So your Twitter strategy starts around two main concepts:

1) Creating a posting schedule you can stick to – that isn’t entirely about you.

2) Finding the influencers in your niche, and even if you don’t try to build a relationship with them, at least knowing who they are and what they post.

prospecting on twitter

Once you figure out who the influencers are, start looking for prospects.

By the time you’ve gotten your bearings about the landscape of Twitter, you’ll be comfortable enough to start looking for prospects. First, set up 3 private lists – competitors, prospects, and neither.

You set up these lists for your own research and knowledge. Competitors are obvious: these are accounts you’ve identified as your direct competition. You don’t have to follow an account to add it to a Twitter list, and they won’t be able to tell you’ve added them to a private list.

Prospects are obvious: they’re the prospects you’ve qualified enough to know they’re potential clients. They won’t know you’ve added them to a short list of accounts to target directly, so this list is your short list of accounts to actively focus on.

Your “neither” list is a way to know if you’ve already checked out the follower. You add them to this private list not as a way to dismiss them, but as a check mark of sorts. When you go to add them to a list, you’ll be able to see if they’re already there. It’s a 10 second check instead of a 5 to 10 minute Google-LinkedIn hunt. The “neithers” are followers who you couldn’t learn enough about to know if they were a prospect or not. 

Start with the followers you’ve already acquired in the week or two it’s taken you to learn a bit about who’s who on Twitter.

Are any of those followers potential prospects? If you can’t tell, try looking them up on LinkedIn. If you can’t find them, add them to the “neither” list.

Those who are prospects get added to your private “prospects” list. Try to look through that list at least once a week, and engage with their tweets. Don’t look them up every day and engage with every single thing they post; that’s just weird.

Once a week means you care enough to see what they’re saying, and it’s often enough that they’ll start to remember you without finding it creepy. At least, if they’re active on a daily basis. If they’re less active, scale back how often you interact. Make a note for yourself in your CRM, or set a task in Salesforce to look at them only every other week.

The key is to be seen in their likes/retweets/replies just enough to be remembered, but not enough for them to go “oh, they must be desperate – they liked all of our tweets again.”

When you see an account that’s clearly a competitor, add it to your “competitors” list. This is entirely for research purposes. You want to see what they’re posting, and whose content they’re retweeting or interacting with. If what they do seems to be working, copy that. If what they do seems to be falling flat – no engagements, no followers, etc – then make sure you don’t do what they do.

Start checking out hashtags as well.

Things like #Telecom may need some filters applied, and that’s where a nice social media management tool comes in handy. Hootsuite, Hubspot, and Sprout Social (my personal favorites) all have stream filtering options that let you watch mentions of specific hashtags that are filtered down to only what you decide is genuinely relevant.

You can simply search through Twitter with some key phrases you think your prospects would use, as well.

Remember, though, it needs to be phrases or words your prospects would use. They’re not going to tweet about being a business of a certain size, or about their budget for your services, or the tools they want. They’re going to tweet about their industry, their problems, or just plain share information about their business.

Check for those tweets once or twice a week. You don’t need to spend hours a day on Twitter – in fact, you shouldn’t.

Get your efforts down to less than half an hour a couple times a week. Twitter is going to take time to work. Don’t burn out on it by spending half your day, every day, trying to make it work in the first week.

twitter for telecom

Figure out what works, and keep doing that.

It’s probably going to take you at least a month to start building an appreciable audience, longer if you’re starting from zero.

Don’t take it personally, and don’t be disheartened.

Other folks in the telecom space are going to be on Twitter just as infrequently as you. You’ll have to work at getting through their skepticism and distrust to actually be a person they view as a resource, just like at a conference where you meet people face to face.

Twitter is just an extension of that type of environment. As long as you’re not sleazy or pushy, and you have some patience, you’ll connect with people if you keep trying.

Just like a conference, Twitter is best at being a “first touch”, not a final conversion or serious conversation point. You don’t expect to make a sale on the conference floor, although that would be nice – don’t expect Twitter to be where your sales happen, either.

Instead, it’s a great way to get people to move towards a more serious platform (LinkedIn, anyone?), or have them click through on your content and convert on your website – where your email nurturing efforts get them to the point of being a sale.

Twitter isn’t a magic solution for your sales funnel any more than any other technique is. What it does best is keep the very, very top of your funnel full.

Keep that in mind with your Twitter tactics. Don’t invest everything you have into it, but don’t neglect it, either. Be consistent, and don’t be sleazy.

Do that, and you’ll see success.

Eventually.

How long does it take?

To give you an idea of the timeline you can expect, it took me over a year of trying to build my account to the 2,000 follower threshold after having a neglected account with 100 followers for several years. After the first year, I used a follower building tool (Social Quant), which skyrocketed my follower count – but it’s a fairly mixed bag.

My followers are generally in the B2B space, but they’re in a wide variety of industries. I also have quite a few growing marketers, agencies, and other marketing specialists following me. It’s a very wide net, and I like having the resources available for recommendations if someone needs help that I can’t provide.

Case in point –

I work often with Kathleen Glass, CMO of Oinkodomeo, who has spent longer growing her followers, but is much, much more targeted about her audience. When I first began working with her nearly 3 years ago, she was just under the 2,000 follower threshold herself, and today (September 18th, 2017), she’s at just over 5,700 followers.

Kathleen targets a very specific audience (TEM is a big part of that), and while her audience is, by the strict numbers, smaller than mine – hers is arguably more valuable, as they’re all related directly to her niche.

In TEM, you want to be more like Kathleen’s Twitter account than mine. Be targeted, be specific, and really try to engage with your audience. No, you can’t engage with 5,000 people on a regular basis, but thanks to lists, you can find who’s the most active, and engage with those people.

Having 500 targeted, telecom-specific fans is going to be far more beneficial to an individual sales person than 5,000 general fans who like inspirational quotes and cute dog photos.